Casa 9 Hotel

If there are no more rooms available, visit The Everywhere Home, a Casa9 project. Same service, same love for hosting.

WE ARE CASA 9

ABOUT US

casa9 is a four-bedroom Luxury Petit Hotel / Bed & Breakfast concept. We are located in an old Mexican Casona dated from 1910 that has been remodeled by architects Rafael Rivera and Javier Claveri from Habitacion116. Its interior design is a mix of modern / Mexican inspiration, bringing together tradition and design for a unique elegant yet cozy environment. It is located in one of the most vibrant neighborhoods, where galleries and restaurants thrive.

OUR STORY

Casa9 lived in oblivion for many years, a home once owned by a Mexican elite family during the 1910s became forgotten in the last decades of the 20th century. Little by little the house was taken by nature and the city, little by little its opulence seemed to fade away leaving just a distant remainder of what once was, until a new family fell in love with it and began remodeling and reviving this beautiful home.
Today casa9’s current owners opens its doors with the purpose of sharing their home to all who want to live a truly exceptional experience and service.
Please, make yourself at home in this traditional yet reinvented Mexican Casona, where you can feel the opulence of an era long gone and live the comforts and relaxed atmosphere of the present day.

WE LOVE EVERYTHING

CITY LOVE

Tetetlán

This is absolutely worth the trip, this beautiful restaurant locked away in a 1970´s home in the south of the city in El Pedregal, a neighborhood designed by Luis Barraqgan in a restored home by Barragan himself, this neighborhood  became the epitome of Mexican modern design. The complete project is worth visiting. Restaurant/yoga studio/ library/gallery is a must on your list.

+52 (55) 5668 5335

http://www.tetetlan.com/tetetlan/

Cafe Milou

Part of our neighbors, this cafe is as pretty as it gets. A little bit of Paris in Mexico City their menu is French inspired but you can find local produce and elements that make this a perfect early dinner sipping wine and cheese walking distance from casa9.

(55) 7098-1422

[email protected]

Taqueria Orinoco

This is a classic Mexican Taquería, it doesn ́t get more real that this, so if you are up to the challenge please visit Orinoco and try an original Mexican Taco. This is a traditional stop after hours when hunger strikes after a night in the city open until 4am.

+52 55 5514 6917

http://www.taqueriaorinoco.com

Meroma

Contemporary cuisine based on traditional ingredients and techniques. Carefully crafters this ingredients are part of thir chefs carefully chosen producers that give each of their plates a very delicate and thought composition. It is worth the try.

+52 (55) 59 20 26 54

www.meroma.mx

Lalo!

A quick breakfast or a coffee while you walk around the Roma Neighborhood: Laló! Mexican confort food in a very relaxed ambient.

+52 55 5564 3388

http://eat-lalo.com

Churreria the Moro

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

http://elmoro.mx

Dulceria Celaya

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5521 1787

dulceriadecelaya.com/

Aurora Música viva

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5264 1547

http://auroraroma.mx

Covadonga

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5533 2701

banquetescovadonga.com.mx/

Romita Comedor

While the Romita is really a restaurant more than a bar, dishing out excellent coastal dishes like langoustine tacos and ceviches, its open-air terrace makes it an ideal drinking spot. Here, surrounded by hanging plants and vines, in a striking, airy dining room, guests are suspended above the hustle and bustle of the Roma neighborhood below. Excellent cocktails, made with fresh ingredients, make it worth having a long sobremesa—basically, a long hang-out after the meal is over.

+52 55 5525 8975

www.romitacomedor.com/

Azul Histórico

Ricardo Muñoz Zurita, the chef behind this small chain of restaurants, has developed and re-discovered certain moles and salsas that were otherwise almost totally unknown in Mexico City, even among serious foodies. The Mole Negro, heavily condimented Chipotle salsa, and Oaxacan tortilla soup are just a few of the highlights that also happen to be among the most affordable when it comes to serious gourmet eats in town. Of his four restaurants, his latest opening on the patio of a 17th-century palace, is definitely the most glamorous, and a heavenly break from the Centro’s busy streets.

+52 55 5510 1316

azul.rest/

Casa Virginia

After opening their wonderful café, Delirio, on a busy corner in the Roma, prominent chef Monica Patiño and her daughter Micaela Miguel managed to charm the building’s owner, an elderly woman named Virginia, into renting them the entire building—a 1920’s French Beaux Arts-style home with high ceilings, tall windows, and old-fashioned tiled floors. They then created Casa Virginia, a homey and refined space. The menu changes often, including ratatouilles—the restaurant’s now-famous red snapper covered in tapenade—and a great assortment of veg-centric, seasonal dishes are all served family-style in the airy, white-washed dining room.

+52 55 5207 1813

casavirginia.mx/

Pujol

Pujol has been qualified as one of the best 50 restaurants in the world. Enrique Olvera’s Pujol tops pretty much every list when it comes to dining in Mexico City. Using native ingredients like ant eggs and huitlacoche (a delicacy made out of corn fungus), he’s completely deconstructed Mexican cuisine molecular gastronomy style, so while some of the ingredients may be recognizable, the flavors on offer are totally new. Here, in a small, dark, and unassuming dining room decorated with white tablecloths and stark white tableware, it’s Olvera and head chef Erick Guerrero’s culinary experiments that take center stage: There might be an egg hidden in a puffed tortilla, or a taco may come in liquid form. The daily-changing prix fixe menus are full of surprises.

+52 55 5545 4111

pujol.com.mx/

 

Amaya

Amaya is the second offering from chef Jaír Téllez – who helped place Mexico’s Valle de Guadalupe on the culinary map with his first restaurant, Laja – and is a fusion of Baja Californian and Mediterranean cuisine. An effortlessly cool spot where colorful floor tiles and exposed-brick walls create industrial yet chic surrounds, it’s one of the few places in Mexico City where you can eat at the bar. The soft-shell crab has become somewhat of a cult classic and the all-natural wine list reflects Laja’s roots in the wine region, while being an excellent opportunity to sample some local grapes. Order a carajillo as a digestif – it’s the Mexican version of an espresso martini on the rocks.

+52 55 5592 5571

www.amayamexico.com

San Angel Inn

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000, CDMX.

 

Mercado de San Juan

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000, CDMX.

 

Rosetta

Located in what was once a Beaux Arts mansion in the Roma neighborhood, Rosetta has a distinctly homey feel, with a dining room painted in pastel frescoes that wind through the restaurant’s many rooms. Here, Chef/owner Elena Reygadas—who trained with Giorgio Locatelli at his restaurant in London—dishes out a daily-changing menu with fresh burrata to start, fantastic risottos, stunningly delicate pasta dishes, and house-made bread so good she’s now opened two bakeries. This is undoubtedly the best Italian in the city, and it comes with its fleet of die-hard fans, so reservations are a must.

+52 55 5533 7804

rosetta.com.mx

Máximo Bistrot

When the team at Maximo Bistrot says “daily-changing menu,” they mean it. Early every morning, the cooks at this Parisian-inspired corner restaurant head to the local markets to buy the day’s freshest ingredients, and then chef Eduardo Garcia comes up with the dishes: Luscious risottos, perfectly moist roast chicken, an amazing burnt eggplant dip, even a simple beet dish is a revelation. It’s no surprise that celebrities, tourists, local office workers, and residents all happily share this teensy, charming eatery.

+52 55 5264 4291

maximobistrot.com.mx/

 

El Parnita

This is the place to get a glimpse of Mexico City’s cool cats. Busy and somewhat chaotic, Parnita fills up daily with a local creative crowd who come to socialize and network. The menu is mainly composed of snack foods such as tacos, chile rellenos (stuffed peppers), ceviche and tlacoyos (cornmeal-dough pockets). The idea is to share plates, order mezcal after mezcal and indulge in the Mexican notion of sobremesa, translating to “over-the-table” and meaning a long, boozy lunch that stretches into the evening.

+52 55 5264 7551

elparnita.com/

Contramar

Contramar has always been a staple in La Roma, created by renowned chef Gabriela Camara creator also of Cala San Francisco, Contramar sister restaurant. It serves the best seafood in the city; don’t miss the tuna tostadas with chipotle mayo, caramelized onions and avocado (they have been copied everywhere, but none are quite as good here) and daily fish prepared “a la talla” (to size) with various seasonings. It’s only open for lunch and booking is essential.

+52 55 5514 9217

contramar.com.mx

Ojo de agua condesa

In one of Condesa’s most atmospheric spots – all canopied streets, dog walkers, joggers, fountains and yoga studios – Ojo de Agua has become something of a healthy-eating mecca. Their juice menu spans every possible combination of local fruits and vegetables, their lunch salads and wraps should be eaten on a park bench, and the restaurant serves as a market for organic produce and wellness products. The young-professional crowd are regular customers, and it’s usually packed all day.

+52 55 6395 8000

grupoojodeagua.com.mx

Lardo

On a sunny street corner in La Condesa, Italian restaurant Lardo serves up healthy breakfasts, juices, pastries and gourmet coffee. For lunch and dinner, hearty tapas such as tomato and herb-filled calamari, zucchini blossoms with ricotta and baked pasta are shared between groups of friends. Sit at the bar and watch the chef’s bustle about the open kitchen, stealing glances at the dishes being prepared in front of your eyes and ordering one too many plates.

+52 55 5211 7731

Postal address

Cuernavaca 9-A, Co. Condesa,
Mexico City, 11560

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