WE ARE CASA 9

ABOUT US

casa9 is a four-bedroom Luxury Petit Hotel / Bed & Breakfast concept. We are located in an old Mexican Casona dated from 1910 that has been remodeled by architects Rafael Rivera and Javier Claveri from Habitacion116. Its interior design is a mix of modern / Mexican inspiration, bringing together tradition and design for a unique elegant yet cozy environment. It is located in one of the most vibrant neighborhoods, where galleries and restaurants thrive.

OUR STORY

 Casa9 lived in oblivion for many years, a home once owned by a Mexican elite family during the 1910s became forgotten in the last decades of the 20th century. Little by little the house was taken by nature and the city, little by little its opulence seemed to fade away leaving just a distant remainder of what once was, until a new family fell in love with it and began remodeling and reviving this beautiful home.
 Today casa9’s current owners opens its doors with the purpose of sharing their home to all who want to live a truly exceptional experience and service. 
Please, make yourself at home in this traditional yet reinvented Mexican Casona, where you can feel the opulence of an era long gone and live the comforts and relaxed atmosphere of the present day.

 

WE LOVE EVERYTHING

CITY LOVE

Tetetlán

This is absolutely worth the trip, this beautiful restaurant locked away in a 1970´s home in the south of the city in El Pedregal, a neighborhood designed by Luis Barraqgan in a restored home by Barragan himself, this neighborhood  became the epitome of Mexican modern design. The complete project is worth visiting. Restaurant/yoga studio/ library/gallery is a must on your list.

+52 (55) 5668 5335

http://www.tetetlan.com/tetetlan/

Cafe Milou

Part of our neighbors, this cafe is as pretty as it gets. A little bit of Paris in Mexico City their menu is French inspired but you can find local produce and elements that make this a perfect early dinner sipping wine and cheese walking distance from casa9.

(55) 7098-1422

info@cafemilou.com

Taqueria Orinoco

This is a classic Mexican Taquería, it doesn ́t get more real that this, so if you are up to the challenge please visit Orinoco and try an original Mexican Taco. This is a traditional stop after hours when hunger strikes after a night in the city open until 4am.

+52 55 5514 6917

http://www.taqueriaorinoco.com

Meroma

Contemporary cuisine based on traditional ingredients and techniques. Carefully crafters this ingredients are part of thir chefs carefully chosen producers that give each of their plates a very delicate and thought composition. It is worth the try.

+52 (55) 59 20 26 54

www.meroma.mx

Lalo!

A quick breakfast or a coffee while you walk around the Roma Neighborhood: Laló! Mexican confort food in a very relaxed ambient.

+52 55 5564 3388

http://eat-lalo.com

Churreria the Moro

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

http://elmoro.mx

Dulceria Celaya

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5521 1787

dulceriadecelaya.com/

Aurora Música viva

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5264 1547

http://auroraroma.mx

Covadonga

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5533 2701

banquetescovadonga.com.mx/

Romita Comedor

While the Romita is really a restaurant more than a bar, dishing out excellent coastal dishes like langoustine tacos and ceviches, its open-air terrace makes it an ideal drinking spot. Here, surrounded by hanging plants and vines, in a striking, airy dining room, guests are suspended above the hustle and bustle of the Roma neighborhood below. Excellent cocktails, made with fresh ingredients, make it worth having a long sobremesa—basically, a long hang-out after the meal is over.

+52 55 5525 8975

www.romitacomedor.com/

Azul Histórico

Ricardo Muñoz Zurita, the chef behind this small chain of restaurants, has developed and re-discovered certain moles and salsas that were otherwise almost totally unknown in Mexico City, even among serious foodies. The Mole Negro, heavily condimented Chipotle salsa, and Oaxacan tortilla soup are just a few of the highlights that also happen to be among the most affordable when it comes to serious gourmet eats in town. Of his four restaurants, his latest opening on the patio of a 17th-century palace, is definitely the most glamorous, and a heavenly break from the Centro’s busy streets.

+52 55 5510 1316

azul.rest/

Casa Virginia

After opening their wonderful café, Delirio, on a busy corner in the Roma, prominent chef Monica Patiño and her daughter Micaela Miguel managed to charm the building’s owner, an elderly woman named Virginia, into renting them the entire building—a 1920’s French Beaux Arts-style home with high ceilings, tall windows, and old-fashioned tiled floors. They then created Casa Virginia, a homey and refined space. The menu changes often, including ratatouilles—the restaurant’s now-famous red snapper covered in tapenade—and a great assortment of veg-centric, seasonal dishes are all served family-style in the airy, white-washed dining room.

+52 55 5207 1813

casavirginia.mx/

Pujol

Pujol has been qualified as one of the best 50 restaurants in the world. Enrique Olvera’s Pujol tops pretty much every list when it comes to dining in Mexico City. Using native ingredients like ant eggs and huitlacoche (a delicacy made out of corn fungus), he’s completely deconstructed Mexican cuisine molecular gastronomy style, so while some of the ingredients may be recognizable, the flavors on offer are totally new. Here, in a small, dark, and unassuming dining room decorated with white tablecloths and stark white tableware, it’s Olvera and head chef Erick Guerrero’s culinary experiments that take center stage: There might be an egg hidden in a puffed tortilla, or a taco may come in liquid form. The daily-changing prix fixe menus are full of surprises.

+52 55 5545 4111

pujol.com.mx/

 

Amaya

Amaya is the second offering from chef Jaír Téllez – who helped place Mexico’s Valle de Guadalupe on the culinary map with his first restaurant, Laja – and is a fusion of Baja Californian and Mediterranean cuisine. An effortlessly cool spot where colorful floor tiles and exposed-brick walls create industrial yet chic surrounds, it’s one of the few places in Mexico City where you can eat at the bar. The soft-shell crab has become somewhat of a cult classic and the all-natural wine list reflects Laja’s roots in the wine region, while being an excellent opportunity to sample some local grapes. Order a carajillo as a digestif – it’s the Mexican version of an espresso martini on the rocks.

+52 55 5592 5571

www.amayamexico.com

San Angel Inn

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000, CDMX.

 

Mercado de San Juan

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000, CDMX.

 

Rosetta

Located in what was once a Beaux Arts mansion in the Roma neighborhood, Rosetta has a distinctly homey feel, with a dining room painted in pastel frescoes that wind through the restaurant’s many rooms. Here, Chef/owner Elena Reygadas—who trained with Giorgio Locatelli at his restaurant in London—dishes out a daily-changing menu with fresh burrata to start, fantastic risottos, stunningly delicate pasta dishes, and house-made bread so good she’s now opened two bakeries. This is undoubtedly the best Italian in the city, and it comes with its fleet of die-hard fans, so reservations are a must.

+52 55 5533 7804

rosetta.com.mx

Máximo Bistrot

When the team at Maximo Bistrot says “daily-changing menu,” they mean it. Early every morning, the cooks at this Parisian-inspired corner restaurant head to the local markets to buy the day’s freshest ingredients, and then chef Eduardo Garcia comes up with the dishes: Luscious risottos, perfectly moist roast chicken, an amazing burnt eggplant dip, even a simple beet dish is a revelation. It’s no surprise that celebrities, tourists, local office workers, and residents all happily share this teensy, charming eatery.

+52 55 5264 4291

maximobistrot.com.mx/

 

El Parnita

This is the place to get a glimpse of Mexico City’s cool cats. Busy and somewhat chaotic, Parnita fills up daily with a local creative crowd who come to socialize and network. The menu is mainly composed of snack foods such as tacos, chile rellenos (stuffed peppers), ceviche and tlacoyos (cornmeal-dough pockets). The idea is to share plates, order mezcal after mezcal and indulge in the Mexican notion of sobremesa, translating to “over-the-table” and meaning a long, boozy lunch that stretches into the evening.

+52 55 5264 7551

elparnita.com/

Contramar

Contramar has always been a staple in La Roma, created by renowned chef Gabriela Camara creator also of Cala San Francisco, Contramar sister restaurant. It serves the best seafood in the city; don’t miss the tuna tostadas with chipotle mayo, caramelized onions and avocado (they have been copied everywhere, but none are quite as good here) and daily fish prepared “a la talla” (to size) with various seasonings. It’s only open for lunch and booking is essential.

+52 55 5514 9217

contramar.com.mx

Ojo de agua condesa

In one of Condesa’s most atmospheric spots – all canopied streets, dog walkers, joggers, fountains and yoga studios – Ojo de Agua has become something of a healthy-eating mecca. Their juice menu spans every possible combination of local fruits and vegetables, their lunch salads and wraps should be eaten on a park bench, and the restaurant serves as a market for organic produce and wellness products. The young-professional crowd are regular customers, and it’s usually packed all day.

+52 55 6395 8000

grupoojodeagua.com.mx

Lardo

On a sunny street corner in La Condesa, Italian restaurant Lardo serves up healthy breakfasts, juices, pastries and gourmet coffee. For lunch and dinner, hearty tapas such as tomato and herb-filled calamari, zucchini blossoms with ricotta and baked pasta are shared between groups of friends. Sit at the bar and watch the chef’s bustle about the open kitchen, stealing glances at the dishes being prepared in front of your eyes and ordering one too many plates.

+52 55 5211 7731

Jules Basement

Inspired by the trend for speakeasy bars in NYC, Jules Basement jumped on the bandwagon and brought the concept to Mexico in 2012. And like its NYC predecessors, there are rules here: You must make a reservation in advance, you must enter through an industrial refrigerator door at the back of a taqueria, and once inside the striking, leather-clad, subterranean bar there are no Jägermeister, bad beers, or Red Bull-based drinks allowed. All of this makes for a pretty civilized evening enjoying both classic cocktails like Manhattans and Martinis and some pretty amazing riffs on these, like the mezcal laced Campari cocktail. Tuesdays are the best night to make a reservation.

+52 55 5280 1278

julesbasement.com

La Condesa

Just around the corner our neighbors at CondesaDF is located is host to some of the more hipster-y bars in town but that’s definitely not the case at the fourth-floor terrace here. Up among the jacaranda trees, guests perch on a few comfy lounge chairs and munch on the offerings from the “Smart Sushi” menu. The cocktails are fairly standard—and good—but it’s the views of the turn of the century architecture nearby, and the tranquility that make the hotel’s terrace a perfect escape. Later on, after a few cocktails, head down to the hotel’s underground nightclub which tends to get packed on the weekends.

+ 52 (55) 5241 2600

condesadf.com

Departamento

El Departamento or “the apartment” is exactly as the name suggests, presenting a relaxed space reminiscent of your musician friend’s apartment. Turntables sit in the corner and an evolving roster of local artists’ work adorns the walls, adding to the casually cool nature of the place. Drop by post-dinner and don’t be surprised if the live music turns a quick drink into an evening of dancing and debauchery.

+52 55 2855 9154

departamento.tv

Casa Franca

A welcome addition to Mexico City’s late-night scene, Casa Franca is a multi-room jazz bar that conjures the spirit of prohibition-era speakeasies. Rooms are scattered with eccentric design details and appear to be connected in a haphazard fashion that creates an air of mystery and provides perfect corners for seduction. Well-executed cocktails, live music and delicious tapas create a fun setting for couples or groups looking to reserve a whole room to themselves.

+52 55 5208 2265

https://www.facebook.com/Lacasamerida109

Zinco Jazz Club

The city’s best jazz bar is hidden underground inside a former bank vault in Centro. Entering feels like walking into a scene from the James Bond’s Spectre, which was set just a few blocks away. The crowd is made up of bohemians, students, intellectuals, business types – anyone who enjoys good music – thanks to nightly live acts ranging from Mexican jazz bands to swing, soul and blues.

+52 1 55 6869 0514

zincojazz.com/

Baltra Bar

Baltra is inspired by Darwin’s exploration of the Galapagos Islands in the 19th century. The team behind it is the group from Limantour, another popular haunt in the city which has made it to the lists of the World’s Best Bars. On our visit, it was their “apium o opium” cocktail that stole the show – a mix of mezcal, citrus and celery bitters. The atmosphere is warm and mellow with friends joining tables together beneath sketches from Darwin’s travels, mummified butterflies and ostrich eggs.

+52 55 5264 1279

baltra.bar/

M.N. Roy

This is the after-hours club of Mexico City, often hosting famous international DJs and artists. It’s the kind of place that everyone somehow ends up at, so try your best to get there before 3AM to avoid the chaotic queues on the pavement. The building once belonged to Mexican communist party founder M. N. Roy and was converted into a nightclub by French architects Emmanuel Picault and Ludwig Godefroy. Word of warning: time melts away in dark corners and on the sweaty dancefloor here – before you know it the sun has risen and it’s time to go home.

+52 55 6681 0348

mnroyclub.com

Maison Artemisia

Run by a group of young French expats, this cozy restaurant and cocktail parlour hosts live music (think jazz, folk, blues) every Tuesday night. The French-Mediterranean restaurant is illuminated by twinkling candlelight; after dinner, head to the lounge upstairs – one of the only bars in La Roma – where you’ll find comfortable sofas and drinks served in vintage crystal ware. Try the Zacatecas old fashioned (bourbon, homemade sugar syrup, bitters and burnt orange) and absinthes sourced from around the world.

+52 55 6303 2471

maisonartemisia.com

 

Tetetlán

This is absolutely worth the trip, this beautiful restaurant locked away in a 1970´s home in the south of the city in El Pedregal, a neighborhood designed by Luis Barraqgan in a restored home by Barragan himself, this neighborhood  became the epitome of Mexican modern design. The complete project is worth visiting. Restaurant/yoga studio/ library/gallery is a must on your list.

+52 (55) 5668 5335

http://www.tetetlan.com/tetetlan/

Cafe Milou

Part of our neighbors, this cafe is as pretty as it gets. A little bit of Paris in Mexico City their menu is French inspired but you can find local produce and elements that make this a perfect early dinner sipping wine and cheese walking distance from casa9.

(55) 7098-1422

info@cafemilou.com

Taqueria Orinoco

This is a classic Mexican Taquería, it doesn ́t get more real that this, so if you are up to the challenge please visit Orinoco and try an original Mexican Taco. This is a traditional stop after hours when hunger strikes after a night in the city open until 4am.

+52 55 5514 6917

http://www.taqueriaorinoco.com

Meroma

Contemporary cuisine based on traditional ingredients and techniques. Carefully crafters this ingredients are part of thir chefs carefully chosen producers that give each of their plates a very delicate and thought composition. It is worth the try.

+52 (55) 59 20 26 54

www.meroma.mx

Lalo!

A quick breakfast or a coffee while you walk around the Roma Neighborhood: Laló! Mexican confort food in a very relaxed ambient.

+52 55 5564 3388

http://eat-lalo.com

Churreria the Moro

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

http://elmoro.mx

Dulceria Celaya

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5521 1787

dulceriadecelaya.com/

Aurora Música viva

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5264 1547

http://auroraroma.mx

Covadonga

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5533 2701

banquetescovadonga.com.mx/

Romita Comedor

While the Romita is really a restaurant more than a bar, dishing out excellent coastal dishes like langoustine tacos and ceviches, its open-air terrace makes it an ideal drinking spot. Here, surrounded by hanging plants and vines, in a striking, airy dining room, guests are suspended above the hustle and bustle of the Roma neighborhood below. Excellent cocktails, made with fresh ingredients, make it worth having a long sobremesa—basically, a long hang-out after the meal is over.

+52 55 5525 8975

www.romitacomedor.com/

Azul Histórico

Ricardo Muñoz Zurita, the chef behind this small chain of restaurants, has developed and re-discovered certain moles and salsas that were otherwise almost totally unknown in Mexico City, even among serious foodies. The Mole Negro, heavily condimented Chipotle salsa, and Oaxacan tortilla soup are just a few of the highlights that also happen to be among the most affordable when it comes to serious gourmet eats in town. Of his four restaurants, his latest opening on the patio of a 17th-century palace, is definitely the most glamorous, and a heavenly break from the Centro’s busy streets.

+52 55 5510 1316

azul.rest/

Casa Virginia

After opening their wonderful café, Delirio, on a busy corner in the Roma, prominent chef Monica Patiño and her daughter Micaela Miguel managed to charm the building’s owner, an elderly woman named Virginia, into renting them the entire building—a 1920’s French Beaux Arts-style home with high ceilings, tall windows, and old-fashioned tiled floors. They then created Casa Virginia, a homey and refined space. The menu changes often, including ratatouilles—the restaurant’s now-famous red snapper covered in tapenade—and a great assortment of veg-centric, seasonal dishes are all served family-style in the airy, white-washed dining room.

+52 55 5207 1813

casavirginia.mx/

Pujol

Pujol has been qualified as one of the best 50 restaurants in the world. Enrique Olvera’s Pujol tops pretty much every list when it comes to dining in Mexico City. Using native ingredients like ant eggs and huitlacoche (a delicacy made out of corn fungus), he’s completely deconstructed Mexican cuisine molecular gastronomy style, so while some of the ingredients may be recognizable, the flavors on offer are totally new. Here, in a small, dark, and unassuming dining room decorated with white tablecloths and stark white tableware, it’s Olvera and head chef Erick Guerrero’s culinary experiments that take center stage: There might be an egg hidden in a puffed tortilla, or a taco may come in liquid form. The daily-changing prix fixe menus are full of surprises.

+52 55 5545 4111

pujol.com.mx/

 

Amaya

Amaya is the second offering from chef Jaír Téllez – who helped place Mexico’s Valle de Guadalupe on the culinary map with his first restaurant, Laja – and is a fusion of Baja Californian and Mediterranean cuisine. An effortlessly cool spot where colorful floor tiles and exposed-brick walls create industrial yet chic surrounds, it’s one of the few places in Mexico City where you can eat at the bar. The soft-shell crab has become somewhat of a cult classic and the all-natural wine list reflects Laja’s roots in the wine region, while being an excellent opportunity to sample some local grapes. Order a carajillo as a digestif – it’s the Mexican version of an espresso martini on the rocks.

+52 55 5592 5571

www.amayamexico.com

San Angel Inn

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000, CDMX.

 

Mercado de San Juan

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000, CDMX.

 

Rosetta

Located in what was once a Beaux Arts mansion in the Roma neighborhood, Rosetta has a distinctly homey feel, with a dining room painted in pastel frescoes that wind through the restaurant’s many rooms. Here, Chef/owner Elena Reygadas—who trained with Giorgio Locatelli at his restaurant in London—dishes out a daily-changing menu with fresh burrata to start, fantastic risottos, stunningly delicate pasta dishes, and house-made bread so good she’s now opened two bakeries. This is undoubtedly the best Italian in the city, and it comes with its fleet of die-hard fans, so reservations are a must.

+52 55 5533 7804

rosetta.com.mx

Máximo Bistrot

When the team at Maximo Bistrot says “daily-changing menu,” they mean it. Early every morning, the cooks at this Parisian-inspired corner restaurant head to the local markets to buy the day’s freshest ingredients, and then chef Eduardo Garcia comes up with the dishes: Luscious risottos, perfectly moist roast chicken, an amazing burnt eggplant dip, even a simple beet dish is a revelation. It’s no surprise that celebrities, tourists, local office workers, and residents all happily share this teensy, charming eatery.

+52 55 5264 4291

maximobistrot.com.mx/

 

El Parnita

This is the place to get a glimpse of Mexico City’s cool cats. Busy and somewhat chaotic, Parnita fills up daily with a local creative crowd who come to socialize and network. The menu is mainly composed of snack foods such as tacos, chile rellenos (stuffed peppers), ceviche and tlacoyos (cornmeal-dough pockets). The idea is to share plates, order mezcal after mezcal and indulge in the Mexican notion of sobremesa, translating to “over-the-table” and meaning a long, boozy lunch that stretches into the evening.

+52 55 5264 7551

elparnita.com/

Contramar

Contramar has always been a staple in La Roma, created by renowned chef Gabriela Camara creator also of Cala San Francisco, Contramar sister restaurant. It serves the best seafood in the city; don’t miss the tuna tostadas with chipotle mayo, caramelized onions and avocado (they have been copied everywhere, but none are quite as good here) and daily fish prepared “a la talla” (to size) with various seasonings. It’s only open for lunch and booking is essential.

+52 55 5514 9217

contramar.com.mx

Ojo de agua condesa

In one of Condesa’s most atmospheric spots – all canopied streets, dog walkers, joggers, fountains and yoga studios – Ojo de Agua has become something of a healthy-eating mecca. Their juice menu spans every possible combination of local fruits and vegetables, their lunch salads and wraps should be eaten on a park bench, and the restaurant serves as a market for organic produce and wellness products. The young-professional crowd are regular customers, and it’s usually packed all day.

+52 55 6395 8000

grupoojodeagua.com.mx

Proyectos Monclova Art Gallery

Established in 2005, PROYECTOSMONCLOVA is a contemporary art gallery that has become one of the most important forums for contemporary art in Mexico City. In 2015 the gallery embarked on a new direction to facilitate dialogues between Mexican and international artists from different generations including: Eduardo Terrazas, Fred Sandback, Martín Soto Climent, Josephine Meckseper, Tercerunquinto, Helen Escobedo and Chantal Peñalosa among others.

http://proyectosmonclova.com

01 55 5525 9715

Xochimilco

Xochimilco

Granted, these colorful, gondola-like boat trips are of one of the classic tourist activities in Mexico, and you’ll need to summon all your hardcore negotiating skills when hailing a trajinera, but spending the afternoon cruising the ancient canals in this area by boat is a lot of fun. Many local families head here for long, lazy afternoon cruises, accompanied by hired mariachi groups who serenade them via boat. Beers and snacks can be hailed on the canal too, meaning you don’t have to pack too much of a picnic.

https://www.visitmexico.com/en/main-destinations/mexico-city/xochimilco

Wrestling Arena Coliseo

Mexico City offers some of the most fashion-forward cultural and culinary experiences of any major metropolis, but it is also the home to many Mexican stereotypes – so park your incredulity at the door and spend a Friday night among the colorful and flamboyant characters of Mexico’s lucha libre. Purchase a mask on your way in, grab a salt-rimmed michelada (a Mexican drink made with beer, lime juice, and assorted sauces) and choose your técnico (a good guy) or a rudo (a bad guy) to cheer on. The energy of the arena is exhilarating, and you’ll find yourself screaming obscenities in no time at all.

+52 55 5588 0266

http://www.cmll.com

Biblioteca Vasconcelos

This massive public library is absolutely striking and worth the journey for anyone with an interest in architecture. Designed by Alberto Kalach, amazingly, the bookshelves actually form part of the building’s structure, so that the individual book spines fill the space with thousands of colors. A Gabriel Orozco whale skeleton hangs in the lobby and there’s a well-manicured botanical garden outside, just a couple more reasons why this space is so awesome to hang out in, regardless of whether you’re checking out a book.

+52 55 9157 2800

http://www.bibliotecavasconcelos.gob.mx

Luis Barragán House and Studio

Tucked away in a residential neighborhood near Chapultepec park, you’ll find a handful of homes and gardens designed by Mexico’s only Pritzker prize winning architect, Luis Barragan. This was his home, which he designed in its entirety, from the structure to the furniture to the color palette, is pretty much exactly as he left it and open for reserved tours only. They’re generally conducted by lucky architecture students who, aside from showing you around the house, demonstrating his playful tricks with light and optics, are happy to share juicy tidbits about his life.

+52 55 5515 4908

casaluisbarragan.org

Museo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo

This is one of the main stops on the Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo pilgrimage, as they lived in this home on and off for twenty years. Their muralist friend Juan O’Gorman designed the now iconic house specifically for them, with separate buildings for each, united by a drawbridge between the two (they notoriously needed a lot of space from one another). It’s a quick stop that’s mostly worth it for the architecture, with a small temporary exhibition space, a few rooms dedicated to both artists, and Diego’s studio, where he made many of his most famous paintings surrounded by floor-to-ceiling windows and huge paper maché Judas sculptures.

+52 55 8647 5470

https://estudiodiegorivera.inba.gob.mx/

Galería OMR

A contemporary art gallery located in Mexico City. Galería OMR was founded in 1983 by its principals Patricia Ortiz Monasterio and Jaime Riestra. The gallery is located in the Roma district which is now recognized as the leading art scene area in Mexico City.

The gallery represents emerging and established contemporary artists, and it is the exclusive representative of the estates of Adolfo Riestra and Luis Ortiz Monasterio,[1]and Alberto Gironella.[2] Since its beginning, Galería OMR has been a major influence on the arts in Mexico, showing avant-garde artists that have now become some of the referential points of the Mexican art scene.

+52 55 5207 1080

galeriaomr.com/

Kurimanzutto

Monica Manzutto and her husband José Kuri’s gallery is probably the first to roll off anyone’s tongue when talking about the contemporary art scene in Mexico. Together with their pal Gabriel Orozco, probably Mexico’s most famous contemporary artist, in the early 2000’s they came up with the idea of presenting the work of their contemporaries in pop-up spaces all over the city (and the world). Of course, nowadays, those artists—among them, Daniel Guzmán, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Damián Ortega—are big names and so is Kurimanzutto, which settled into a gorgeous gallery space in 2008, with quite the roster of local and international artists. Don’t miss this gallery.

+52 55 5256 2408

www.kurimanzutto.com/

Templo Mayor Museum

When Hernan Cortés and his army of Spanish Conquistadors arrived in México city—then Tenochtitlan—they raised the Aztec capital, destroyed its temples, and used many of the building materials to erect their own palaces and, famously, the Cathedral. There are few remnants left of what was once the capital of the vast Mesoamerican Empire, but the ruins of their most important temple, the Templo Mayor, which is located right next to the Zócalo, were discovered in the late ’70s and have been open to visitors ever since. The site is an active archaeological dig, with some pretty impressive ancient frescoes, and an on-site museum displaying the thousands of ancient artefacts—elaborate offerings.

https://www.templomayor.inah.gob.mx

Museo Dolores Olmedo Patiño

Dolores Olmedo was one of Diego Rivera’s greatest patrons and her home, an ex-hacienda near Xochimilco, houses her collection of his works through the years, along with those of other artists and craftsmen she supported during her lifetime. While the collections are magnificent, and a real window into the breadth of Rivera’s talents and career, the expansive grounds themselves—gorgeous native gardens that are home to her beloved hairless Xoloescuintle dogs and a family of peacocks—are a heavenly respite from the city’s busy streets. In October and November, the museum puts on an awesome Day of the Dead display, as Doña Lola always did when she was alive.

+52 55 5555 0891

museodoloresolmedo.org.mx

 

Chapultepec Castle

Fun fact: Mexico was, for a short time, under the rule of Maximilian I, a puppet emperor put in place by Napoleon III. The empire didn’t last long, but his 18th-century castle on a hill overlooking Chapultepec Park remains. Today it’s the National Museum of History, adorned in historical murals by José Clemente Orozco, Juan O’Gorman, and David Alfaro Siqueiros, and displaying costumes and historical ephemera from the 16th-century on. The most exciting rooms, though, are the ones that show exactly how the Emperor and his wife lived in the castle; meanwhile, the views of the park below are stunning.

https://www.chapultepec.com.mx/visita.php?Lugar=2

Museo Jumex

A contemporary-art museum designed by David Chipperfield, el Museo Jumex exhibits part of one of the largest private collections of contemporary art in Latin America (works include Jeff Koons, Andreas Gursky, Olafur Eliasson and Gabriel Orozco). The museum’s unique saw-tooth roof is made from white concrete and was designed to imbue the upper levels of the museum with natural light, while each space is adapted in an original way every time a new curator intervenes.

undacionjumex.org

+52(55) 5395 2618

Museo Diego Rivera-Anahuacalli

An imposing structure towering over a hill in the city’s south, el Museo Anahuacalli epitomizes the magnetism and force of its founder, artist Diego Rivera. Made from volcanic stone, the museum almost resembles an Aztec temple and was indeed constructed to form a teocalli (god house) influenced by the Teotihuacan culture with Mayan and Aztec touches – note the hexagonal and rectangular arcs that serve as entrances to the different showrooms. Among the 50,000 pieces of pre-Hispanic art are funerary urns, masks and sculptures and an exhibition of papier-mâché sculpture relating to the Day of the Dead.

+52 55 5617 3797

museoanahuacalli.org.mx

Ciudad Universitaria

Located in southern Mexico City, UNAM is Latin America’s largest university and houses some incredible architecture (it’s a UNESCO World Heritage Site) as well as the MUAC museum and a sculpture garden from some of the country’s greatest artists. Its main campus was built during the 1950s on an ancient solidified lava bed and is almost a separate region within Mexico City, with its own regulations and councils. Wander the university passages and stare up at the thought-provoking murals, which illustrate different strains of intellectual thought. Check out their website for the latest concerts and events, as MUAC often holds some of the best exhibitions in the country and the Neza concert hall.

Palacio de Bellas Artes

This striking white-marble palace is the city’s main concert and arts hall. It has several quirky architectural details as it was built in phases by various architects of different nationalities. Its exterior is principally neoclassical and art nouveau (interlaced with indigenous mythological symbols and characters, such as depictions of Tlaloc and Chaac, the Aztec and Maya deities of water) while inside art deco and marble reign. On the top floor you’ll find sweeping murals by Rufino Tamayo, Diego Rivera and Siqueiros among others.

https://palacio.inba.gob.mx/

Cine Tonalá

A neighborhood favorite, this is an independent cinema which holds daily screenings of rising Mexican talent as well a rotating selection of international films. In the cinema’s dimly lit antechamber, vintage Jodorowsky posters line the walls along with popcorn machines, a café serving pizza and communal tables where you’ll find people discussing the latest film. Tonalá also holds concerts, workshops, comedy nights and other events, so check their calendar to see what’s on while you’re in town.

+52 664 688 0118

https://cinetonala.mx/

Museo Experimental El Eco

Founded by renowned architect Mathias Goeritz in the 1950s, El Eco still upholds his vision of an interdisciplinary meeting space for the arts. Those who know Barragán (who collaborated on the museum) will recognize his play on light and space within the building’s walls and corridors, as well as his signature architecture in which visitors experience the space as a penetrable sculpture to interact with. The annual architectural competition Pavilion Eco takes place in the museum’s central patio.

+52 55 5535 5186

http://eleco.unam.mx

Marso Galería de Arte Contemporáneo / Fundación Marso

A handsome mansion in the Juárez neighborhood is home to this contemporary-art gallery promoting both Mexican and international artists. MARSO collaborates with cultural institutions, runs residency programs, publishes books and represents rising talent such as Virginia Colwell, Michael Conrads and Jong Oh. Check out their “salaseis” room, meant for the exchange of ideas between design, architecture and invention.

+52 55 7095 6840

fundacionmarso.org

Tetetlán

This is absolutely worth the trip, this beautiful restaurant locked away in a 1970´s home in the south of the city in El Pedregal, a neighborhood designed by Luis Barraqgan in a restored home by Barragan himself, this neighborhood  became the epitome of Mexican modern design. The complete project is worth visiting. Restaurant/yoga studio/ library/gallery is a must on your list.

+52 (55) 5668 5335

http://www.tetetlan.com/tetetlan/

Cafe Milou

Part of our neighbors, this cafe is as pretty as it gets. A little bit of Paris in Mexico City their menu is French inspired but you can find local produce and elements that make this a perfect early dinner sipping wine and cheese walking distance from casa9.

(55) 7098-1422

info@cafemilou.com

Taqueria Orinoco

This is a classic Mexican Taquería, it doesn ́t get more real that this, so if you are up to the challenge please visit Orinoco and try an original Mexican Taco. This is a traditional stop after hours when hunger strikes after a night in the city open until 4am.

+52 55 5514 6917

http://www.taqueriaorinoco.com

Meroma

Contemporary cuisine based on traditional ingredients and techniques. Carefully crafters this ingredients are part of thir chefs carefully chosen producers that give each of their plates a very delicate and thought composition. It is worth the try.

+52 (55) 59 20 26 54

www.meroma.mx

Lalo!

A quick breakfast or a coffee while you walk around the Roma Neighborhood: Laló! Mexican confort food in a very relaxed ambient.

+52 55 5564 3388

http://eat-lalo.com

Churreria the Moro

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

http://elmoro.mx

Dulceria Celaya

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5521 1787

dulceriadecelaya.com/

Aurora Música viva

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5264 1547

http://auroraroma.mx

Covadonga

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5533 2701

banquetescovadonga.com.mx/

Romita Comedor

While the Romita is really a restaurant more than a bar, dishing out excellent coastal dishes like langoustine tacos and ceviches, its open-air terrace makes it an ideal drinking spot. Here, surrounded by hanging plants and vines, in a striking, airy dining room, guests are suspended above the hustle and bustle of the Roma neighborhood below. Excellent cocktails, made with fresh ingredients, make it worth having a long sobremesa—basically, a long hang-out after the meal is over.

+52 55 5525 8975

www.romitacomedor.com/

Azul Histórico

Ricardo Muñoz Zurita, the chef behind this small chain of restaurants, has developed and re-discovered certain moles and salsas that were otherwise almost totally unknown in Mexico City, even among serious foodies. The Mole Negro, heavily condimented Chipotle salsa, and Oaxacan tortilla soup are just a few of the highlights that also happen to be among the most affordable when it comes to serious gourmet eats in town. Of his four restaurants, his latest opening on the patio of a 17th-century palace, is definitely the most glamorous, and a heavenly break from the Centro’s busy streets.

+52 55 5510 1316

azul.rest/

Casa Virginia

After opening their wonderful café, Delirio, on a busy corner in the Roma, prominent chef Monica Patiño and her daughter Micaela Miguel managed to charm the building’s owner, an elderly woman named Virginia, into renting them the entire building—a 1920’s French Beaux Arts-style home with high ceilings, tall windows, and old-fashioned tiled floors. They then created Casa Virginia, a homey and refined space. The menu changes often, including ratatouilles—the restaurant’s now-famous red snapper covered in tapenade—and a great assortment of veg-centric, seasonal dishes are all served family-style in the airy, white-washed dining room.

+52 55 5207 1813

casavirginia.mx/

Pujol

Pujol has been qualified as one of the best 50 restaurants in the world. Enrique Olvera’s Pujol tops pretty much every list when it comes to dining in Mexico City. Using native ingredients like ant eggs and huitlacoche (a delicacy made out of corn fungus), he’s completely deconstructed Mexican cuisine molecular gastronomy style, so while some of the ingredients may be recognizable, the flavors on offer are totally new. Here, in a small, dark, and unassuming dining room decorated with white tablecloths and stark white tableware, it’s Olvera and head chef Erick Guerrero’s culinary experiments that take center stage: There might be an egg hidden in a puffed tortilla, or a taco may come in liquid form. The daily-changing prix fixe menus are full of surprises.

+52 55 5545 4111

pujol.com.mx/

 

Amaya

Amaya is the second offering from chef Jaír Téllez – who helped place Mexico’s Valle de Guadalupe on the culinary map with his first restaurant, Laja – and is a fusion of Baja Californian and Mediterranean cuisine. An effortlessly cool spot where colorful floor tiles and exposed-brick walls create industrial yet chic surrounds, it’s one of the few places in Mexico City where you can eat at the bar. The soft-shell crab has become somewhat of a cult classic and the all-natural wine list reflects Laja’s roots in the wine region, while being an excellent opportunity to sample some local grapes. Order a carajillo as a digestif – it’s the Mexican version of an espresso martini on the rocks.

+52 55 5592 5571

www.amayamexico.com

San Angel Inn

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000, CDMX.

 

Mercado de San Juan

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000, CDMX.

 

Rosetta

Located in what was once a Beaux Arts mansion in the Roma neighborhood, Rosetta has a distinctly homey feel, with a dining room painted in pastel frescoes that wind through the restaurant’s many rooms. Here, Chef/owner Elena Reygadas—who trained with Giorgio Locatelli at his restaurant in London—dishes out a daily-changing menu with fresh burrata to start, fantastic risottos, stunningly delicate pasta dishes, and house-made bread so good she’s now opened two bakeries. This is undoubtedly the best Italian in the city, and it comes with its fleet of die-hard fans, so reservations are a must.

+52 55 5533 7804

rosetta.com.mx

Máximo Bistrot

When the team at Maximo Bistrot says “daily-changing menu,” they mean it. Early every morning, the cooks at this Parisian-inspired corner restaurant head to the local markets to buy the day’s freshest ingredients, and then chef Eduardo Garcia comes up with the dishes: Luscious risottos, perfectly moist roast chicken, an amazing burnt eggplant dip, even a simple beet dish is a revelation. It’s no surprise that celebrities, tourists, local office workers, and residents all happily share this teensy, charming eatery.

+52 55 5264 4291

maximobistrot.com.mx/

 

El Parnita

This is the place to get a glimpse of Mexico City’s cool cats. Busy and somewhat chaotic, Parnita fills up daily with a local creative crowd who come to socialize and network. The menu is mainly composed of snack foods such as tacos, chile rellenos (stuffed peppers), ceviche and tlacoyos (cornmeal-dough pockets). The idea is to share plates, order mezcal after mezcal and indulge in the Mexican notion of sobremesa, translating to “over-the-table” and meaning a long, boozy lunch that stretches into the evening.

+52 55 5264 7551

elparnita.com/

Contramar

Contramar has always been a staple in La Roma, created by renowned chef Gabriela Camara creator also of Cala San Francisco, Contramar sister restaurant. It serves the best seafood in the city; don’t miss the tuna tostadas with chipotle mayo, caramelized onions and avocado (they have been copied everywhere, but none are quite as good here) and daily fish prepared “a la talla” (to size) with various seasonings. It’s only open for lunch and booking is essential.

+52 55 5514 9217

contramar.com.mx

Ojo de agua condesa

In one of Condesa’s most atmospheric spots – all canopied streets, dog walkers, joggers, fountains and yoga studios – Ojo de Agua has become something of a healthy-eating mecca. Their juice menu spans every possible combination of local fruits and vegetables, their lunch salads and wraps should be eaten on a park bench, and the restaurant serves as a market for organic produce and wellness products. The young-professional crowd are regular customers, and it’s usually packed all day.

+52 55 6395 8000

grupoojodeagua.com.mx

TANE

High quality silver orfebres that have become tradition in Mexico. TANE is the example of silversmith work in Mexico they are part of the Mexican craftsmanship history, they have been around for more than 75 years has been characterised for its unique passion for design with silver.

http://www.tane.com.mx/tane-home

Chic by accident

Owned by Emmanuel Picault, a man with an exceptional eye, a finder of treasures. He spends his weekends in Mexico ́s flea markets or private collection s looking for the perfect piece of furniture. His findings ends up at his four-story 1920s mansion in Colonia Roma, some of this finidingd will be redone with his exquisite taste, some will be showcased as found.

01 55 8117 1140

Emmanuel Picault

Sangre de mi sangre

Modern and alternative mexican jewelry designed by Mariana Villareal who has become one of the most relevant Jewelry designers in Mexico. Her pieces are dearing and unique, it is a most if you like design.

01 55 5511 8599

http://www.sdemis.com

LONJA MERCANTIL

This nomadic design market has been going since 2010, with 15 or more editions to date, where culture and contemporary design is promoted in direct contact with the designers, producers and new and always innovating proposal on Mexico. This itinerant market in one of the most original proposals in the city where design, traditional market and food make the experience unique.

+52 55 5537 3846

http://www.lalonja.mx

Sandra Weil

Long silk dresses, draped trousers and culottes, and delicate blouses are the kind of feminine pieces you’ll find at Peruvian designer Sandra Weil’s flagship store. Located in Polanco, in a new complex of cool clothing and design boutiques, you can also find her elegant line of wedding dresses here, hanging in a beautiful system of vertical plywood racks designed by the up-and-coming architects Zeller y Moye. If you can’t find what you’re looking for, you can enlist her couture service to tweak any of her designs just for you.

+52 55 5280 7597

http://sandraweil.com

Onora

The brainchild of Maggie Galton, a NYC transplant who spent years working with artisans across the country, and business brain Maria Eladia Hagerman, Onora sells beautiful handicrafts designed for contemporary homes. Banish visions of multicolored fiestas from your head, though, their palette is restrained to black, white, grey, beige, and the occasional pop of color, and the products themselves are exquisite. They carry black clay candleholders from Oaxaca, table runners from Chiapas, serving dishes from Puebla, and much more—this shop makes us want to start over and redecorate.

 Lope de Vega 330, Polanco, Polanco V Secc, 11560 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

+52 55 5203 0938

Yakampot

Francisco Cancino’s line of sleek, pared down women’s clothing is a big hit among Mexico’s magazine editors, and we can see why. First there are the elegant, season-less silhouettes that make his clothing a wardrobe perennial, and then there’s the fact that it’s all handmade by artisans across the country. Fittingly, his first shop in Polanco, designed by Emiliano Godoy and Tuux, is built with the same local, sustainable principles as his clothing. Check out Yakampot’s sister brand, Arroz con Leche, for adorable kids’ clothes.

 +52 55403861

https://www.yakampot.com

Rivero Lake Rodrigo

Rodrigo Rivero Lake’s office in a penthouse apartment in Polanco and his warehouse in Naucalpan are kind of insane, packed to the brim with museum quality antiques from Mexico, India, and beyond, along with paintings and sculptures by major modern Mexican artists. An incurable collector, he’s spent a lifetime on the hunt both in Mexican flea markets, at European auction houses, and on the road in India. On the weekends, he heads to the Lagunilla Antiques Market in Mexico City, where all the vendors know him by name, and always have a thing or two to show him.

Campos Elíseos 199, Polanco, Polanco IV Secc, 11570 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

+52 55 5281 5505

Decada Vintage Furniture

This is probably one of the best shops for high-quality Mid-Century antiques in the city, as owners Cecilia Tena and Lucía Corredor split time between Berlin and New York buying and importing their finds back to their shop in Polanco. You’ll find retro credenzas, Herman Miller tables and chairs, Anglepoise-style lamps, and everything you need to stock a vintage bar—all in great condition and displayed in inspiring vignettes. The owners were living in Berlin when they got the idea to open up a vintage shop in Mexico City, hoping to bring a little bit of its playfulness into modern Mexican interiors.

 +52 55 6234 5081

www.decada.com.mx

ROMA QUINCE

When it comes to home decor, this newly opened concept store in an old restored mansion in the Roma is doing a lot of things right: They’ve gathered a handful of supremely tasteful, local textile and accessories brands—all previously basically unknown in the city—like Bindilou, Namuh, and San Miguel Allende’s Casa Acanto, and brought them under one roof. In addition, there’s also our favorite, Trinitate, which makes gorgeous white-glazed tableware a la Astier de Villatte, and an endless variety of garden ornaments. Basically, you can come here and decorate an entire home in purely hand-crafted goods, without it looking folksy or tired. Plus, they’ve also brought a handful of clothing brands.

Medellín 67, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

+52 55 5207 8682

Mercado San Angel

If you don’t have the opportunity to visit one of Mexico’s pueblos mágicos, the Saturday market in San Angel is the closest you’ll get to experiencing the cobblestoned charm of rural Mexico. Fountains splash lazily in the center of squares surrounded by beautiful historic buildings painted in antique shades of red, yellow and pink. Wander through the local artist’s market, sidestep the diners overflowing onto the pavements and take a moment to roam the gardens of San Jacinto. Finish the afternoon in the courtyard of San Angel Inn savoring a perfectly prepared margarita.

It opens every day until 7pm

Av. Revolución 1787-1801, San Ángel, 01000 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Tetetlán

This is absolutely worth the trip, this beautiful restaurant locked away in a 1970´s home in the south of the city in El Pedregal, a neighborhood designed by Luis Barraqgan in a restored home by Barragan himself, this neighborhood  became the epitome of Mexican modern design. The complete project is worth visiting. Restaurant/yoga studio/ library/gallery is a must on your list.

+52 (55) 5668 5335

http://www.tetetlan.com/tetetlan/

Cafe Milou

Part of our neighbors, this cafe is as pretty as it gets. A little bit of Paris in Mexico City their menu is French inspired but you can find local produce and elements that make this a perfect early dinner sipping wine and cheese walking distance from casa9.

(55) 7098-1422

info@cafemilou.com

Taqueria Orinoco

This is a classic Mexican Taquería, it doesn ́t get more real that this, so if you are up to the challenge please visit Orinoco and try an original Mexican Taco. This is a traditional stop after hours when hunger strikes after a night in the city open until 4am.

+52 55 5514 6917

http://www.taqueriaorinoco.com

Meroma

Contemporary cuisine based on traditional ingredients and techniques. Carefully crafters this ingredients are part of thir chefs carefully chosen producers that give each of their plates a very delicate and thought composition. It is worth the try.

+52 (55) 59 20 26 54

www.meroma.mx

Lalo!

A quick breakfast or a coffee while you walk around the Roma Neighborhood: Laló! Mexican confort food in a very relaxed ambient.

+52 55 5564 3388

http://eat-lalo.com

Churreria the Moro

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

http://elmoro.mx

Dulceria Celaya

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5521 1787

dulceriadecelaya.com/

Aurora Música viva

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5264 1547

http://auroraroma.mx

Covadonga

By day, the Covadonga’s denizens are generally old Spanish guys playing dominoes and eating traditional Asturian delicacies like tortilla Española, but by night it’s a whole different demographic that flocks here. Young local hipsters arrive around 7pm to begin their night out with a few beers—and shots—among friends. It’s an old cantina—a traditional drinking den—and the futbol is always on TV, the aging waiters wear prim black vests over starchy white shirts, and the interiors haven’t had a makeover in what feels like 50 years. It’s comforting to know, though, that even in the Roma, one of the hippest parts of town, some places never change.

+52 55 5533 2701

banquetescovadonga.com.mx/

Romita Comedor

While the Romita is really a restaurant more than a bar, dishing out excellent coastal dishes like langoustine tacos and ceviches, its open-air terrace makes it an ideal drinking spot. Here, surrounded by hanging plants and vines, in a striking, airy dining room, guests are suspended above the hustle and bustle of the Roma neighborhood below. Excellent cocktails, made with fresh ingredients, make it worth having a long sobremesa—basically, a long hang-out after the meal is over.

+52 55 5525 8975

www.romitacomedor.com/

Azul Histórico

Ricardo Muñoz Zurita, the chef behind this small chain of restaurants, has developed and re-discovered certain moles and salsas that were otherwise almost totally unknown in Mexico City, even among serious foodies. The Mole Negro, heavily condimented Chipotle salsa, and Oaxacan tortilla soup are just a few of the highlights that also happen to be among the most affordable when it comes to serious gourmet eats in town. Of his four restaurants, his latest opening on the patio of a 17th-century palace, is definitely the most glamorous, and a heavenly break from the Centro’s busy streets.

+52 55 5510 1316

azul.rest/

Casa Virginia

After opening their wonderful café, Delirio, on a busy corner in the Roma, prominent chef Monica Patiño and her daughter Micaela Miguel managed to charm the building’s owner, an elderly woman named Virginia, into renting them the entire building—a 1920’s French Beaux Arts-style home with high ceilings, tall windows, and old-fashioned tiled floors. They then created Casa Virginia, a homey and refined space. The menu changes often, including ratatouilles—the restaurant’s now-famous red snapper covered in tapenade—and a great assortment of veg-centric, seasonal dishes are all served family-style in the airy, white-washed dining room.

+52 55 5207 1813

casavirginia.mx/

Pujol

Pujol has been qualified as one of the best 50 restaurants in the world. Enrique Olvera’s Pujol tops pretty much every list when it comes to dining in Mexico City. Using native ingredients like ant eggs and huitlacoche (a delicacy made out of corn fungus), he’s completely deconstructed Mexican cuisine molecular gastronomy style, so while some of the ingredients may be recognizable, the flavors on offer are totally new. Here, in a small, dark, and unassuming dining room decorated with white tablecloths and stark white tableware, it’s Olvera and head chef Erick Guerrero’s culinary experiments that take center stage: There might be an egg hidden in a puffed tortilla, or a taco may come in liquid form. The daily-changing prix fixe menus are full of surprises.

+52 55 5545 4111

pujol.com.mx/

 

Amaya

Amaya is the second offering from chef Jaír Téllez – who helped place Mexico’s Valle de Guadalupe on the culinary map with his first restaurant, Laja – and is a fusion of Baja Californian and Mediterranean cuisine. An effortlessly cool spot where colorful floor tiles and exposed-brick walls create industrial yet chic surrounds, it’s one of the few places in Mexico City where you can eat at the bar. The soft-shell crab has become somewhat of a cult classic and the all-natural wine list reflects Laja’s roots in the wine region, while being an excellent opportunity to sample some local grapes. Order a carajillo as a digestif – it’s the Mexican version of an espresso martini on the rocks.

+52 55 5592 5571

www.amayamexico.com

San Angel Inn

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000, CDMX.

 

Mercado de San Juan

This local food market near Centro is where all the gourmet, rare and exotic foods are to be found; top chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors arrive at the break of dawn to secure the cream of the crop. It has its origins in the pre-Hispanic open-air markets known as “tianguis” where produce would be laid out on the floor. If you wander the aisles, you’ll quickly pick up on the many nuances that compromise the Mexican palate, along with stranger ingredients such as crocodile, ostrich, kangaroo, stingrays and chicatana salsa made from Oaxacan flying ants. Indispensable stops are at Delicatessen La Jersey Gourmet, Las Tapas de San Juan and productos Oaxaqueños to try everything from the country’s

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000, CDMX.

 

Rosetta

Located in what was once a Beaux Arts mansion in the Roma neighborhood, Rosetta has a distinctly homey feel, with a dining room painted in pastel frescoes that wind through the restaurant’s many rooms. Here, Chef/owner Elena Reygadas—who trained with Giorgio Locatelli at his restaurant in London—dishes out a daily-changing menu with fresh burrata to start, fantastic risottos, stunningly delicate pasta dishes, and house-made bread so good she’s now opened two bakeries. This is undoubtedly the best Italian in the city, and it comes with its fleet of die-hard fans, so reservations are a must.

+52 55 5533 7804

rosetta.com.mx

Máximo Bistrot

When the team at Maximo Bistrot says “daily-changing menu,” they mean it. Early every morning, the cooks at this Parisian-inspired corner restaurant head to the local markets to buy the day’s freshest ingredients, and then chef Eduardo Garcia comes up with the dishes: Luscious risottos, perfectly moist roast chicken, an amazing burnt eggplant dip, even a simple beet dish is a revelation. It’s no surprise that celebrities, tourists, local office workers, and residents all happily share this teensy, charming eatery.

+52 55 5264 4291

maximobistrot.com.mx/

 

El Parnita

This is the place to get a glimpse of Mexico City’s cool cats. Busy and somewhat chaotic, Parnita fills up daily with a local creative crowd who come to socialize and network. The menu is mainly composed of snack foods such as tacos, chile rellenos (stuffed peppers), ceviche and tlacoyos (cornmeal-dough pockets). The idea is to share plates, order mezcal after mezcal and indulge in the Mexican notion of sobremesa, translating to “over-the-table” and meaning a long, boozy lunch that stretches into the evening.

+52 55 5264 7551

elparnita.com/

Contramar

Contramar has always been a staple in La Roma, created by renowned chef Gabriela Camara creator also of Cala San Francisco, Contramar sister restaurant. It serves the best seafood in the city; don’t miss the tuna tostadas with chipotle mayo, caramelized onions and avocado (they have been copied everywhere, but none are quite as good here) and daily fish prepared “a la talla” (to size) with various seasonings. It’s only open for lunch and booking is essential.

+52 55 5514 9217

contramar.com.mx

Ojo de agua condesa

In one of Condesa’s most atmospheric spots – all canopied streets, dog walkers, joggers, fountains and yoga studios – Ojo de Agua has become something of a healthy-eating mecca. Their juice menu spans every possible combination of local fruits and vegetables, their lunch salads and wraps should be eaten on a park bench, and the restaurant serves as a market for organic produce and wellness products. The young-professional crowd are regular customers, and it’s usually packed all day.

+52 55 6395 8000

grupoojodeagua.com.mx

Postal adress

Cuernavaca 9-A, Co. Condesa,
Mexico City, 11560

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